Detroit Diesel Troubleshooting Diagrams

Series 60 Cooling System Operation

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At coolant temperatures below approximately 86 – 89 ° C (186 – 193 ° F) for vehicle, industrial, and keel-cooled marine engines or 69 – 73 ° C (156 – 163 ° F) for heat exchanger-cooled marine engines, the thermostat valves remain closed and block the flow of coolant from the engine to the radiator or heat exchanger. During this period, all of the coolant in the system is recirculated through the engine and is directed back to the suction side of the water pump via a bypass tube. As the coolant temperature rises above 86 – 89 ° C (186 – 193 ° F) for vehicle, industrial, and keel-cooled marine engines or 69 — 73 ° C (156 — 163 ° F) for heat exchanger-cooled marine engines, the thermostat valves start to open, restricting the bypass system, and allowing a portion of the coolant to circulate through the radiator or heat exchanger. When the coolant temperature reaches approximately 97 ° C (207 ° F) (or 82 ° C [179 ° F] for heat exchanger-cooled marine engines), the thermostat valves are fully open, the bypass system is blocked off, and the coolant is directed through the radiator or heat exchanger.

Properly operating thermostats are essential for efficient operation of the engine. If the engine operating temperature deviates from the normal range of 86 – 99 ° C (186-210 ° F) (or 69 – 82 ° C [156 — 179 ° F] for heat exchanger-cooled marine engines), inspect and replace the thermostats, if necessary.

1. Oil Cooler Housing ‪ 5. Water Bypass Tube ‪
2. Thermostat Housing ‪ 6. Water Pump ‪
3. Vent Line Outlet ‪ 7. Water Inlet ‪
4. Water Outlet (To Radiator) ‪
None found.

Written by sam

September 19th, 2011 at 3:13 am

One Response to 'Series 60 Cooling System Operation'

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  1. Is there anyway I can get a layout of the whole engine?

    ruben suarez

    6 May 15 at 7:33 pm

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